AT90USB162 development board

The AVR-USB-STK board is a nice development board allowing you to explore the AT90USB162  . This board has a USB connector, a Joystick, a RS232, a SD-MMC card, an Audio output, an ICSP connector and an extension connector.

The AT90USB162 comes  pre-programmed with a bootloader which allows code to be programmed inside the chip without any external programmer, atmel supplies a piece of software that you can use to load your hex code to the device.

The AT90USB162 is a high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 16KB ISP flash memory with read-while-write capabilities, 512B EEPROM, 512 bytes SRAM, 22 general purpose I/O lines, 32 general purpose working registers, two flexible timer/counters with compare modes and PWM, USART, programmable watchdog timer with internal oscillator, SPI serial port, debugWIRE interface for on-chip debugging and programming, and five software selectable power saving modes. The device operates between 2.7-5.5 volts.

A nice easy board to get up and running, olimex supply schematics, a manual and a few code examples and you will see from later I was able to use a low cost USBASP programmer  to program the device using the 10 pin header that you can see in the picture below. There are enough on board features to play with and the pins from the microcontroller come out to a header which is handily located on the side of the board, easy to make your own adaptor board if you wanted.

avr usb stk

avr usb stk

I used a USBAsp with no issues and the khazama AVr programmer. The code was written in MikroC pro for AVR

 

Code

In this example we simply toggle the entire PORTD on and off, there is an onboard LED which will flash on and off, you can also connect another LED as well if you like to test.

void main() {
 
 
  DDRD = 0xFF;           // Set direction to be output
 
  do {
 
    PORTD = 0x00;        // Turn OFF diodes on PORTD
    Delay_ms(1000);      // 1 second delay
 
    PORTD = 0xFF;        // Turn ON diodes on PORTD
    Delay_ms(1000);      // 1 second delay
  } while(1);            // Endless loop
}

 

Links
AVR-USB-STK Atmel AT90USB162 USB Development Board – UK

USB ASP USB ISP 5V AVR SCM Programmer Adapter 10 Pin Cable & Case ATMEGA8 ATMEGA128 For Arduino Support Win 7 64Bit

OLIMEX AVR-USB-STK AT90USB162, USB, ICSP, SD/MMC CARD, DEV BOARD – US

RKP40c development board kit

I was looking for a basic development board for the ATmega16/32 microcontrollers, I did not want one of the boards that has masses of components on the board such as LEDs, switches and LCD headers but just a bare bones board that is more like a breakout type.

Here is a picture of the board I found, it has an ISP and the ARduino RX and TX type connection (FTDI and other devices as well). There is a reset switch, oscillator and a couple of LEDs but other than that and a few other components its as basic and bare bones as you can get, key thing is that all of the ports are connected to headers and clearly labelled.

The board comes as a kit and when assembled should look a bit like this

RKAT40cMCC4

Once built we’ll connect some LEDs and flash them on and off

 

 

Code

Similar to before, written in MikroC Pro for AVR

void main() 
{
DDRD = 0xFF;     // set direction to be output
 
while(1)
{
PORTD = 0x00;
delay_ms(1000); // Wait for 1s
PORTD = 0xFF;
delay_ms(1000); // Wait for 1s
}
}

Testing

I connected a USBAsp to the board and tried to see if I could detect the microcontroller type.

atmega32_avrdudess

As you could see no problems here, so I then connected a couple of LEDs to PORTD and programmed the device. The LEDs flashed on and off as expected

 

Links

More details from http://rkeducation.co.uk/RKAT40c-mcc.php, kit comes in at £3.99 from their online store

RKAT28 development board kit

The RKAT28 is a development board from rkeducation that is aimed at the 28 pin Atmel devices such as the ATmega328p which was commonly used in Arduino boards, this means of course you can take the chip from the Arduino and put it on this development board. The board has the standard ISP connection (6 pin version) and also an Arduino connection in which you can connect the TX and RX lines and use your Arduino as an ISP as well.

Here is a picture of the board

RKAT28www.rkeducation.co.uk

There is a prototyping area on board which has horizontal and vertical rails as well as a set of power rails.

On board there is a 5v regulator and a 3.3v regulator, you can quite easily power this from a 9v / 12v power source. There are 3 LEDs on board for the various power voltages.

The board comes as a kit, this means you will need some basic soldering skills to assemble it but its an easy enough build and there are no really tricky parts to solder as they are all through hole components. The earlier picture shows what you assemble, I added headers for ports and also the power rails as well

To test the board out I decided to toggle PORTC on and off (high and low) and connect some leds.

Code example

Code example was written in MikroC Pro for AVR, later on we will be showing how to connect an Arduino and program using that and also burning a bootloader on the chip, in case you want to do that as well. Arduino IDE does simplify development greatly but this can come at a cost, again we’ll explain how later.

void main() 
{
DDRC = 0xFF;     // set direction to be output
 
while(1)
{
PORTC = 0x00;
delay_ms(1000); // Wait for 1s
PORTC = 0xFF;
delay_ms(1000); // Wait for 1s
}
}

 

Testing

After compiling and building I connected a USBAsp to the ISP connector and used AVRDUDESS to first try and detect the device. In the screenshot below you can see the microcontroller was detected

atmega328p_avrdudess

 

Link

The kit is available from the following site at £7.99

http://rkeducation.co.uk/RKAT28.php

ATmega32 minimum system board

When I was looking at products to buy I saw this little board which is commonly referred to along the lines of ATMEGA32 Minimum System Board AVR Development Board.

The product looked quite a nice little board for prototyping due to its minimalist approach and size. There are 4 switches and 8 LEDs on board that can be used and all I/O from the ATMega is brought out to a header. Here is the board pictured below

ATMEGA32 Minimum System Board

ATMEGA32 Minimum System Board

Features:

– MCU is ATMEGA32L
– System clock 16MHz
– Onboard 3.3V LDO, power indicator lamp, 8 LEDs, one Reset button, 4 independant button, reserve asynchronous clock interface, USB power supply interface.
– Pin out all 32 IO port, jumper choose 3.3V/5V voltage, 6 pin ISP download port, JTAG interface
– Could download directly from USB port

As usual this appears to be a mass produced Chinese developed board with very minimal instructions, now its not the most complex to understand but a schematic is still useful. Anyway I’ve dug up some information. First of all here is the schematic

Atmega minimum board schematics

Atmega minimum board schematics

Looking at the schematics the LEDs are all connected to PORTB, so we will flash these on and off, a sort of hello world type test

 

Code

This example was written in Atmel Studio

#ifndef F_CPU
#define F_CPU 1000000UL // 1 MHz clock speed
#endif
 
#include <avr/io.h>
#include <util/delay.h>
 
int main(void)
{
	DDRB = 0xFF; //Nakes PORTC as Output
	while(1) //infinite loop
	{
		PORTB = 0xFF; //Turns ON All LEDs
		_delay_ms(1000); //1 second delay
		PORTB= 0x00; //Turns OFF All LEDs
		_delay_ms(1000); //1 second delay
	}
}

 

I use a USBAsp programmer with this board, it uses the 6 pin pinout. i actually setup Atmel Studio to program the board using USBAsp

 

Links

These work out about $10 per piece
2PCS LOT ATMEGA32 minimum system board+Free shipping

SparkFun AVR Stick schematics

The SparkFun AVR Stick is a simple data logging device that instantiates itself as an HID keyboard and reports the voltages, along with a ‘timestamp,’ from two pins on an ATtiny85.

The repository is at https://github.com/sparkfun/AVR_Stick  where you can find out more details.

I like looking over the schematics for boards like this, in fact I’ll be posting more creative commons designs. Using the files from the repository you can load them into Eagle and look at the schematics and board layout, if you plan on designing your own boards at some point this can be an invaluable learning aid just seeing how professionals layout schematics neatly and how people layout boards and route them.

Avr stick

Avr stick